Wildlife and Roads: Decision Guide Step 2.1.7

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2.1.1: Identify Species to Benefit from Potential Mitigation

2.1.2: Identify Ecological Processes (Water Flow, Animal Movement, Other)

2.1.3: Identify Landscape and Topographic Features That May Affect Movement and Mitigation

2.1.4: Identify Engineering and Maintenance Concerns

2.1.5: Weigh Cost Concerns with Potential Benefits

2.1.6: Identify Appropriate General Wildlife Crossing Type

2.1.7: Other Mitigation Options

2.1.8: References

2.1.7 Other Mitigation Options

The main objective of this decision tool step is to help the user decide what type of wildlife passage options they may choose from. Wildlife passages are almost always placed in conjunction with other types of mitigation, such as fences and escape ramps. There are also adjustments and retrofits that can be made to existing passages under bridges, culverts, and fencing that can be made to make them more conducive to wildlife movement under the roadway. While a more detailed description of the specifics of these adjustments will be dealt with in Step 2.3, "Determine Configuration," we encourage the reader to follow the link to the Tijeras Canyon Safe Passages Coalition Summer 2007 Newsletter for a detailed example of how existing bridges, culverts and fences can be retrofitted to encourage wildlife movement under the road, in conjunction with new passages, Electrobraid fences and mats, and driver warning systems. If the user wishes to consider other options, such as devices that may further alert drivers to approaching wildlife, or alert wildlife to approaching motorists, we recommend a visit to the website: www.deercrash.com. In this site the authors review the traditional options to prevent deer-vehicle collisions and the efficacy of these methods. The Georgia Department of Transportation has released a report (2007) that explores the issue of deer-vehicle collisions, evaluates the effectiveness of wildlife warning reflectors for altering the behavior of white-tailed deer along roadways, and includes basic information on the sight and hearing capabilities of white-tailed deer. The report also examines ways to reduce the incidence of deer-vehicle collisions. This report may be downloaded from the url: http://trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=7947. There may be technological developments available in the future that would allow drivers of vehicles to become alerted to wildlife further down the road then what can be normally seen with normal vision. See: http://www.marlow.com/Applications/DSP/cadillac_night_vision_system.htm.


2.1.1: Identify Species to Benefit from Potential Mitigation

2.1.2: Identify Ecological Processes (Water Flow, Animal Movement, Other)

2.1.3: Identify Landscape and Topographic Features That May Affect Movement and Mitigation

2.1.4: Identify Engineering and Maintenance Concerns

2.1.5: Weigh Cost Concerns with Potential Benefits

2.1.6: Identify Appropriate General Wildlife Crossing Type

2.1.7: Other Mitigation Options

2.1.8: References

Decision Guide Overview Step 1: Resource Evaluation Step 2: Identify Solutions Step 3: Select & Create Plan Step 4: Construction Step 5: Monitor & Evaluate